Madam and Deva (Мадам и Дева, 2015) by Natalya Mirzoyan

Current Page || History

Madam and Deva
Мадам и Дева
Madam i Deva (ru)
Мис и девойка (bg)

Year 2015
Director(s) Mirzoyan Natalya
Studio(s) Peterburg
Language(s) (wordless)
Genre(s) Comedy
NSFW / 18+
Religion
Romance
Animation Type(s)  Digital 2D
Length 00:06:34
153 visitors

(No subtitles available)

Is the video not playing correctly? Click here.

Description:

A small humorous work joking around with Adam, Eve, her female rival, and the Snake. Adults-only.

Though the credits are bilingual, the title displayed at the start of the film is actually only in English. However, the film is categorized on various websites under the Russian name, while the English name could be somewhat confusing for native English-speakers, since "Madam" is a word in both languages but "Deva" is a word only in Russian and other Slavic languages (meaning "young woman", perhaps an unmarried or virginal one).

 

DISCUSSION



1.Admin

A very feminist film? It was all Adam's fault, and the Snake is actually the good guy. ;)
Totally opposite in temperament to the film submitted by Cynir right before this, Yuletide Stories (also a "religious film directed by a woman", for what it's worth, though one of them loves the faith while the other loves to mock it), which is why I'm going to wait a little 'til the holidays are over to correct the mistake with the language (so it won't show on the front page right next to the other one yet... I don't normally bother, but the contrast just seems a bit too great for this time of year).

As for the film, I probably find such simplistic drawing styles a bit lazy these days, and the basic story to be done a little too often.

I wonder if this is related to the figure of Lilith? (Robert Saakyants' first directorial work dealt with that subject - an interesting if difficult film, though again totally different in temperament to this one)

Adam looking at the underside of the world also reminded me of Mihail Titov's brilliant Yerik (1989), and the very end of Mihail Aldashin's "The Other Side" (1993).


Reply


To add comment, please login or register.