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Comment on Weightless Life. 1. Dialogue with Disney (2006)
2.Admin

>>1
Are you sure? I was the one who did the subtitles for this one, originally in 2007. I think I started on the second one, but never did finish it, and I never saw any of the others subtitled online.

You don't remember where it may have been, so you?



Comment on Weightless Life. 1. Dialogue with Disney (2006)
1.relovitz

I remember finding this online before with subtitles for the whole thing. If there's an English translation for the other parts, I'd be happy to do some syncing! Unfortunately I don't know Russian, so I can't help translate, but I would really love to be able to watch the rest of this documentary again.


Replies: >>2

Comment on Jubilee (1983)
1.Admin

It's not very clear to me what anniversary this film was made for. Various articles say that it was for the "100 year anniversary of animation", but nothing notable happened in animation in 1883 other than the birth of American animation pioneer Max Fleischer, which would not be considered very important in the USSR. Conceivably it was for the 70th anniversary of Ladislas Starevich's films (1912-1913), but the film never even mentions them (probably because it wasn't the Soviet Union at the time, and Starevich fled the communists to live the rest of his life in France). Or for the first Soviet animation in 1923 by Dziga Vertov (which doesn't survive), but again, not mentioned in the film. Nothing notable happened in 1933.

Or perhaps it was for the 75th anniversary of Emile Cohl's Fantasmagorie (1908), often considered to be the first animation on celluloid film, or at least the first 2D animation where each image replaces the one before it, rather than stop motion. It's not mentioned in the film either, but this may just be because they didn't have a copy of it.



Comment on On Your Mark! (1979)
5.RPG_2022

>>4
I'll definitely PM you with suggestions. The website is doing great work in making Soviet and Russian animation accessible to the world.

I also forgot to thank you for making subs for ''He Flew In Only Once''. Good job on that one.

When I was comparing ''The Blue Planet'' to ''Fantastic Planet'' I was talking about the surrealness of both films, even though they respectively use different animation styles: the former employs traditional animation while the latter uses cutout stop-motion. It's always refreshing to see non-US animation as they're different and sometimes thought-provoking.

As you can probably tell, science fiction is my favourite genre.



Comment on On Your Mark! (1979)
4.Admin

>>3
Well, you're free to send me a private message to me through the site any time with suggestions! I might even have subtitles for them already. There are still a lot of films I have subtitles for that aren't on the site yet because I try to check the translation for accuracy before I add anything.

I made Russian subtitles for "The Blue Planet", and will start on the English translation, but it may take a while because it uses "high style" poetry (just like this one). I'm not yet sure how long it will take!

I've seen "Fantastic Planet" and while I really like that film (despite an ending that feels too shallow and naive to me), I don't think there's much similarity with "The Blue Planet". Aside from both being widescreen animated sci-fi that's not very American...


Replies: >>5

Comment on On Your Mark! (1979)
3.RPG_2022

>>2
If you want more suggestions please let me know.


Replies: >>4

Comment on On Your Mark! (1979)
2.Admin

>>1
Thanks for the suggestions! I've added the Shukalyukov (although I wish the video was better quality). I'll try and get to "The Blue Planet" soon. I'd actually come across it before when going through Kazakhfilm's back catalogue, and had put it off for later. Its aspect ratio is wrong on Youtube, but that's easy enough to fix.


Replies: >>3

Comment on Dutch Lullaby (2007)
1.Admin

With some of these lullabies, it's more obvious than with others that the song is not nearly enough to fill up the required 3-minute running time. Especially true here, where the song only begins as the credits begin to roll!

I think this is far from being the strongest entry in this series (that's probably the Ukrainian one, though I also like the Jewish and the French), but no matter; I'll add all the ones for which I can find a translation.



Comment on On Your Mark! (1979)
1.RPG_2022

There's another sci-fi animated short directed by Lev Shukalyukov for Belarusfilm, ''He Came Flying Only Once'' (Russian title: Он прилетал лишь однажды, 1978). There's an upload of the film on YouTube without subs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fm4PQnmzrCE. The short relies more on images than dialogue, but it would be good if subs were made for it.

Another noteworthy Soviet sci-fi animation is ''The Blue Planet'' (Russian title: Голубая планета, 1971) made by Kazakhfilm, also on YouTube without subs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFhFq4mpEs4. It's very reminiscent of Rene Laloux's ''Fantastic Planet'' (1973), even though it was released two years before. Might be worth making subs for this too.

Just putting these out there. I know a little Russian, but not enough to make subs.

Great upload here btw.


Replies: >>2

Comment on The Return of the Prodigal Parrot (1984)
2.Admin

>>1
>Thanks for the great memories :)

You're welcome. :) It went with the era, I think. Did you see the article I linked to in the "series" page? (it's in Russian, but you can use Yandex or Google Translate to read it) I don't know how much I agree, but I thought it was interesting to see how the character and the series is seen nowadays (at least, by some of those who give it enough thought to write articles about it). For what it's worth, the opinion of someone I know who owned a parrot, when I described Kesha's character to them, said "it seems that the writers knew what parrots are like!"

Here's the conclusion of the article (from Yandex Translate, manually fixed-up where needed):

---

The cartoon is certainly witty and its phrases have long since become quotes that live separately from the original source (about Tahiti and "they don't feed us too badly", about "bubblegum" and so on). In the animation and the dynamics, all is wonderful. And therefore, even more disgusting. A mediocre cartoon (or movie, or book) will not really affect one's consciousness.

However, the main character here is a nasty piece of work, and even the mice from "Leopold the Cat" are better. There, at least, the eternal confrontation of cats and mice is played out, but here is just vile betrayal carried out from film to film. What is terrible about this plot? The very possibility of being a scumbag and setting up loved ones...

Everything is served up through a fairy tale. From the mid-1980s, they [that is, "they"] began to actively lay the foundations for a new morality - moreover, the creators themselves did not even realize what they were doing. Kesha is an ideal symbol of the Perestroika society with its endless cries of: "Give! We want changes! Where are our jeans and gum?! Give us music videos and tape players!"

I will note that the prodigal parrot's tastes are typically philistine, pro-Western, and the not-on-brand Vovka, deprived of prestigious imported benefits (which he does not need), constantly turns out to be a fool. He is humiliated, forsaken, but invariably they come back to him with broken wings.

The question arises: why are you needed, Kesha? Why are you loved? Yes, in the 2000s, several more sequels were filmed, but they were completely disastrous, because Kesha was a phenomenon during Perestroika, and in the 2000s, children were already watching other birds, fish and monsters.

---

I think there was indeed a bit of a trend of "cool" characters acting nasty and then either having nothing bad happen to them or being 100% forgiven by their victims in 1980s Soviet animation. Never a majority trend, but it was there. Besides "Kesha", I can think of the aforementioned mice in "Leopold" and Butyrin's "If I Were My Dad" (especially the second one).



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