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Comment on Revival (2000)
2.Тихон

>>1
Interesting, kinda reminds me in style and subject of this short, The Runt


Replies: >>3

Comment on Revival (2000)
1.Admin

Been sick for most of this week, so I haven't been able to update. But I happened to come across this film today, and I think it's a good one, though pretty grim. I marked it "18+" here, but maybe the whole point is that it's meant to be unsettling for younger viewers? Rather makes one lose the appetite for sausages.

Normally I'd translate the title as "Resurrection" (after the Resurrection of Jesus), but it's the same as the name of the studio and they translated it "Revival" (although maybe they chose that as their English studio name and site URL simply because it's a shorter English word with easier to remember spelling). Also, animator.ru translated the title as "Sunday", but that's because whoever did the translation there didn't know the context ("Sunday" in Russian is the same word as "Resurrection").


Replies: >>2

Comment on Merry-Go-Round 5 (1973)
1.Admin

The first film by Ugarov has rather "modern" musical harmonies and is the first appearance of the graphic style that would later be used in his excellent "Music Box with a Secret". Though the actual story is pretty similar to his first one in Merry-Go-Round #2. I tried to translate this one with rhyming couplets, but I think it came out a bit forced in a few lines.

The second film by Barinova (Anatoliy Petrov's wife) is a very simple riddle for children (that works better in Russian than in English, because the names of the animals all begin with "ko"). This seems to be the first time she did a painterly art style like the ones she'd later make in the early 1980s, such as "Cat Catafeyevich". Although by itself, her entry is sweet but nothing special - she wasn't yet the mature and visionary director she would become later.

The third film by Petrov is a successful return to a sci-fi theme and realistic style that he'd earlier used in "The Blue Meteorite", and would continue to use later. I quite like this one, only I wish he'd been as imaginative about showing what's special about the plant (e.g. by zooming in and seeing its fine details) as he was with the sci-fi machinery. Though on second thought, maybe it's fine as it is.

The last, by Gennadiy Sokolskiy, is one of the most characteristically "folk Russian" things you're likely to see and just impossible to translate well. I like it, but it definitely works better in the original language.



Comment on The Magic Ring (1979)
3.Admin

>>2
>this would have also given the daughter more of a reason to run of to big Paris
I mean, daughters did get exchanged between European noble/royal families, so I wouldn't say it's that far-fetched. And the Russian nobility really did often speak French among themselves for a long while, and held France in high regard.

>I think Scarapeya waited for the right moment and place to tell Ivan her secret and to get rescued, after all he rode all the way to some remote place, maybe the snake people don't just want to show up in some populated area, but then again she had thet immensely powerful magical ring... I guess she couldn't gift him her ring if she just fled with it.
Maybe... but it's still confusing because it's just not explained at all.




Comment on The Magic Ring (1979)
2.Тихон

>>1
>Why is the Tsar's palace located in a small town that is clearly not Moscow or St. Petersburg?
Yeah, I felt like they should have been more like local nobles or something, this would have also given the daughter more of a reason to run of to big Paris

>Why did the snake Scarapeya wait so long to reveal who she was, and why did she stay unhappily in Ivan's house if she could have left at any time?
I think Scarapeya waited for the right moment and place to tell Ivan her secret and to get rescued, after all he rode all the way to some remote place, maybe the snake people don't just want to show up in some populated area, but then again she had thet immensely powerful magical ring... I guess she couldn't gift him her ring if she just fled with it.



Replies: >>3

Comment on Merry-Go-Round 4 (1972)
1.Admin

I think Barinova's film is okay, but no more than that - she clearly hadn't found her unique voice yet and I like her later films much better.

I find Nosyrev's film to be just wonderful, and easily the best of the three. Excellent art style, animation, structure, funny dialogue, good music. Maybe even better if the ending hadn't been cut, though I can understand the censors' thinking - and it doesn't really hurt it, just takes away that extra layer. This was to be Nosyrev's last film for a "Merry-Go-Round".

Anatoliy Petrov's is my least favourite, and although it is superficially stylish, I find the main character and his senseless laughter annoying... a step down compared to "The Blue Meteorite".



Comment on The Magic Ring (1979)
1.Admin

I've been busy with some important backend work on the site, so there haven't been any newly added films in recent days. I decided to add this one because I'd already done the translation for it (for the later compilation).

Although I generally really like it, there were two things that always bugged me:
1) Why is the Tsar's palace located in a small town that is clearly not Moscow or St. Petersburg? (I asked Nosyrev this question once, and he replied: "the Tsar from "The Magic Ring" is an aggregated, fairytale figure. Neither St. Petersburg, nor Moscow have any relation to him. The characters and events in the tale are not tied to a concrete place and time, but to a particular historical epoch. The storyteller is free to think up whatever he can imagine in his tale, so long as it is interesting to the listeners (or in this case, the viewers) - that is his primary goal. We're not presenting a historical study, after all, but a joyous spectacle - that's what the folk tale is for.")
2) Why did the snake Scarapeya wait so long to reveal who she was, and why did she stay unhappily in Ivan's house if she could have left at any time? (I still don't know the answer to this one - let me know if anyone has any ideas).


Replies: >>2

Comment on Merry-Go-Round 3 (1971)
9.Тихон

>>8
>P.S. I've got a question. When sorting English titles alphabetically, words like 'A', 'An', or 'The' at the beginning of a title get ignored. Is there something equivalent in German?
Yes, just like in English the articles (der, die, das, ein, eine) are ignored in an alphabetical list (I couldn't find an official guideline to back up my claims for this, but by looking at the list of German movies in wikipedia I feel like my claims are valid. In one case the list of German movies in wikipedia even ignored "im" but in all other cases everything starting with "im" and "in" seems to listed under "I", no Idea why)




Comment on Merry-Go-Round 3 (1971)
8.Admin

>>7
>By the way, I have noticed that the umlauts (Ää, Öö, Üü) are displayed correctly on the update page, but on the entries' pages they are just a string of characters.
Thanks for bringing my attention to this, I'm going to try and fix the existing errors and then figure out why it's doing that.
EDIT: I think I fixed it.

>Adult cartoons might have more material to work with and are more flexible when it comes to work arounds, but i still have to confirm this myself.
It varies. :)

>The easiest and most straight forward one was "Absent-Minded Giovanni"
Likewise.

>But sometimes you need to translate a translation, think about the oratoriums of Haydn "Die Schöpfung" and "Die Jahreszeiten", the librettos were translated from Englisch into German and then back into English for the English audience, so that the text will fit the music.
I had to do that for Hrzhanovskiy's cartoon about English nursery rhymes. He adapted the Russian translation of them, which was not the same as the original English! I had to re-retranslate quite a few lines, although sometimes I left it closer to the original English even though it didn't quite match what was on the screen (for example, in the original English, boys are made of "frogs and snails, and puppy-dogs' tails", but in Russian the "puppy-dogs' tails" are replaced by "seashells", which is what the cartoon shows. But I couldn't figure out a way to work that into the translation, and it is such a well-known line that I left it as it is, though I'm not really happy about it.

>Now speaking of this, I am not really a fan of the 2012 revival of the carousel series, I might translate them for completions sake, but I will see on that.
I haven't seen them, to be honest, so I can't comment... in any case, I'm definitely prioritizing the earlier ones.

P.S. I've got a question. When sorting English titles alphabetically, words like 'A', 'An', or 'The' at the beginning of a title get ignored. Is there something equivalent in German?


Replies: >>9

Comment on Merry-Go-Round 3 (1971)
7.Тихон

>>6
>Sometimes I've found that children's cartoons are the most difficult, because they require a simplicity and economy of language, while the more "adult" things are actually easier.
I think you might be right, especially when it comes to nursery rhymes. Initially it might be easier to understand and translate, but to really make it work on screen is the hard part. The most difficult one so far was "Cock-and-Bull Story" because it was in verses and also had the spoken words often contrast and play around with what was shown on screen, so I had to get the timing of the words right too. The easiest and most straight forward one was "Absent-Minded Giovanni", even the titular wordplay worked perfectly in German (both "рассеянный" and "zerstreut" mean "scattered" as well as "scatterbrained", as he was literally scattered in the cartoon. I just love it when it works out like this).
Adult cartoons might have more material to work with and are more flexible when it comes to work arounds, but i still have to confirm this myself.

>I'd recommend finding things you like - I've always found that the best motivation, regardless of difficulty. :)
I love these cartoons. Even though they are intended for a child or family oriented audience, they are so masterfully crafted and diverse too. Now speaking of this, I am not really a fan of the 2012 revival of the carousel series, I might translate them for completions sake, but I will see on that.

>When I come across a famous poem like that one, I'll usually check to see if it has already been translated. If there's already a good translation, that's as straightforward as can be. ;)
What a simple and elegant solution, why didn't I think of that myself. But sometimes you need to translate a translation, think about the oratoriums of Haydn "Die Schöpfung" and "Die Jahreszeiten", the librettos were translated from Englisch into German and then back into English for the English audience, so that the text will fit the music.

As for the titles of the silent films and the use of articles, its quite interesting. Often times, when I am unsure, I will skip through the film, sometimes I will just use my natural language intuition. I feel like without an article it's about the general principle or occurrence of a thing, the indefinite article is for a random sample or occurrence of a thing and the definite article is for a special or unique thing or occurrance thereof. But interestingly even though our languages, English and German, are quite similar, the use of articles doesn't always work the same. For example in "Boy and Girl" I have translated it as "Der Junge und das Mädchen", but I wouldn't write "Junge und Mädchen", I don't know exactly why, maybe it's just personal preferance, but the later doesn't sound quite right to me, even though the English one doesn't sound wrong to me (keep in mind that I always translate from Russian to not create indirect translations, I sometimes use the English one as orientation).

By the way, I have noticed that the umlauts (Ää, Öö, Üü) are displayed correctly on the update page, but on the entries' pages they are just a string of characters.




Replies: >>8

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